Low-level child neglect is a high-stakes issue

Upset boy against a wall

Guest blog by Emily Buchanan, Research Manager, NFER

Earlier this year, an Action for Children report highlighted that neglect is the most common form of child abuse in the UK today.

Up to one in 10 children across the UK suffers from neglect; it is the most frequent reason for a child protection referral, and it features in 60 per cent of serious case reviews into the death or serious injury of a child. So, how is our research seeking to support those tirelessly campaigning to end child neglect? Continue reading

The way forward for mental health services for children and young people

Black and white photo of young girl.

Image courtesy of Flickr user darcyadelaide using a Creative Commons license

By Steven McGinty

“Not fit for purpose” and “stuck in the dark ages”

These are two of the phrases used by the Care Minister, Norman Lamb, to describe mental health services for children and young people in England. The minister admitted that young people are being let down by the current system and has announced that a new taskforce will look into how the system should be improved.  To coincide with this review, I decided to look at the current situation for children and young people with mental illness, as well as highlight some of the main themes from the latest evidence.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) reports that one in ten children and young people (aged 5-16) have a clinically diagnosed mental health disorder. This covers a broad range of disorders, including emotional disorders, such as anxiety and depression, as well as less common disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and eating disorders. Approximately 2% of these young people will have more than one mental disorder. The most common combinations of disorders are conduct and emotional disorders and conduct and hyperkinetic disorders.

The likelihood of a young person developing a mental disorder is increased depending on a number of individual and family/ social factors. There are a whole range of risk factors, but some of these include:

  • having a parent in prison
  • experiencing abuse or neglect
  • having a parent with a mental health condition
  • having an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD)

It’s important to note that mental illness is complex, and that not everyone in these risk groups will struggle with it. This is particularly true when a young person is in receipt of consistent long-term support from at least one adult.

The impact of mental illness can be particularly difficult for young people. For instance, the National Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) Support Service reported that young people who suffer from anxiety in childhood are 3.5 times more likely to suffer from depression or anxiety in adulthood. There is also an increased chance of young people coming into contact with the criminal justice system, with Young et al highlighting that 43% of young people in prison have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The Centre for Mental Health also suggests that young people with mental health problems struggle to achieve academically, as well as in the employment market.

When a government minister condemns his own department, it’s evident that there are severe problems.  However, this does not have to be the case.

Below I’ve outlined some of the key lessons to come from evidence on what makes a good mental health service for children and young people.

Continue reading

How does where you live affect your wellbeing?

Over crowded tube platform London

People living in areas with a high population density have higher levels of anxiety

by Alan Gillies

How does the place you live affect your wellbeing? That was the topic of two separate studies we received in the Information Service last week. With the current interest in place-making, the issue is a topical one.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the main message from both studies is that people’s own individual characteristics, such as physical health problems, socio-economic status, and employment status, had a much larger relationship with personal wellbeing than the characteristics of the places in which they live. However both studies found that place did have an impact on people’s personal wellbeing. Continue reading

The quest to find young carers: Carers Week 2014

Cooking Togetherby Steven McGinty

This week, throughout the UK, there will be a host of events in support of Carers Week 2014. For the first time, the UK-wide annual awareness campaign is launching the Carers Week Quest, a new initiative to encourage improved collaborative working in local communities to reach out to carers.  It will also be the first time that the valuable role of #youngcarers is recognised, with the introduction of Young Carers Awareness Day on Friday. The theme for this year is ‘identifying carers’.  It is hoped that this week of events can help carers access the support they need, when they need it.  In support of #carersweek, Idox has decided to review the literature on young carers. Continue reading

The Public Bodies (Joint Working) Scotland Act 2014 – should it have gone further?

Health Cubes_iStock_000022075266Largeby Steven McGinty

Last month, on April 1st, the Public Bodies (Joint Working) Scotland Act 2014 was given its royal assent. According to Alex Neil, Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing, this new addition to the statute book signifies a ‘landmark’ change for the provision of healthcare in Scotland. The Act will be introduced in stages, with the full integration of health and social care expected by April 2016. The principal aim is to provide better patient outcomes through the integration of health and social care services. There has been broad support for the new legislation, but some say the Act has not gone far enough. Continue reading

Ending the stigma around anxiety: Mental Health Awareness Week 2014

man crying

by Steven McGinty

Today marks the beginning of Mental Health Awareness week. The campaign started in 2000 with the aim of raising the awareness of a specific mental health issue. Previous issues have included alcohol, stigma and exercise and this year’s focus is the impact of anxiety. To highlight this event, the Knowledge Exchange has summarised some of the most recent literature on anxiety and mental health more generally. Continue reading

Guest blog: Martyn Evans of The Carnegie UK Trust on Measuring Wellbeing

Martyn---large-for-web

by Martyn Evans, Chief Executive at The Carnegie UK Trust

When looking for good practice at an international level it comes as a bit of a shock to find it on your own doorstep. The Carnegie UK Trust, based in Dunfermline in Scotland, has had a focus on wellbeing since 1913 when Andrew Carnegie signed the Trust deed requiring us to “improve the wellbeing” of the people of the UK and Ireland. Our recent work in this area builds on the excellent programme run by the New Economics Foundation. Two years ago we set out to learn more about how wellbeing was being measured. We led on research and international study trips with IPPR North. We concluded, to our surprise and delight, that the Scottish National Performance Framework, now called Scotland Performs, is a global pioneer. Our view was later corroborated by a Professor Stiglitz in his address to the OECD World Forum in India, in 2012. Continue reading